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To find specific sets, use the search function. The best keywords are either the photographer’s name (Michael LeRoy, Elmer Batters, Ron Vogel, Donald Klumpp, etc.) or the colour of my hair (Blonde, Black, or Strawberry Blonde).

Red Peignoir Set by Michael LeRoy

Michael LeRoy was only four years older than I was when he photographed me on May 25, 1963.  He had just completed an apprenticeship with Keith Bernard and I was his first solo effort.  I always remembered it as a “fun” shoot — he kept me laughing the entire day.  That evening, after the session ended, he invited me to his dark room and he gave me three glossy photographs that I have always kept.  LeRoy contacted me in 2012, and as a result I was able to obtain copies of all the b/w photos that he shot on that day.  (He had no color prints left; he must have sold them all to magazines.)  He died a year later.

This is the fourth set of LeRoy photos that I have posted, called the “Red Peignoir” set. LeRoy shot them when I was wearing a red peignoir on an outdoors patio. The peignoir was very sheer and so I was also wearing white underpants. I also have called this series “dancing” because that is what I appear to be doing.

Monsieur magazine published two b/w pictures and one colour photo from this set in its February 1964 issue.

Old iZ New has colorized several photos from this group.  He was able to match the exact colors of the peignoir and the setting from the colour photo that was published in Monsieur magazine.

All the photos in this set, except the color picture that appeared in Monsieur, are available as autographed prints.
 

LeRoy Red Peignoir #1

This is my favourite photo in the set.


 

LeRoy Red Peignoir #1 Colourized

Below is LeRoy Red Peignoir #1 colourized by Old iZ New.


 

LeRoy Red Peignoir #2


 

LeRoy Red Peignoir #2 Colourized

Below is LeRoy Red Peignoir #2 colourized by Old iZ New.


 

LeRoy Red Peignoir #3

A version of this b/w picture was published in Monsieur magazine


 

LeRoy Red Peignoir #3 Colourized

Below is LeRoy Red Peignoir #3 colourized by Old iZ New.


 

LeRoy Red Peignoir #4

Two b/w’s and one color picture from this series were published in a 1964 issue of Monsieur. The photo below was not published although a similar one was; personally, I prefer the one below to the one that was published.


 

LeRoy Red Peignoir #4 Colourized

Below is LeRoy Red Peignoir #4 colourized by Old iZ New.


 

LeRoy Red Peignoir #5

A version of this b/w picture was published in Monsieur magazine.


 

LeRoy Red Peignoir #6


 

LeRoy Red Peignoir #7


 

LeRoy Red Peignoir #8


 

LeRoy Red Peignoir #9

The first bow.


 

LeRoy Red Peignoir #10

The final bow.


 

LeRoy Red Peignoir #11

This colour picture appeared in Monsieur magazine.

Escapade by Donald G. Klumpp

One of my favourite magazine layouts was the one that appeared in Escapade, Dec 1963. The photographer, Donald Klumpp, was young and on a budget.  We shot the entire layout in his small apartment.

Of all the photographers I worked with, Klumpp was the one whose style reminded me the most of Peter Gowland’s photography style. He spent much of his time setting up his lighting and working out the overall composition of the pose while I talked to his wife. (She was young and pretty and, I thought, might have been a former figure model.)

Although Klumpp and I worked together in early spring 1962, his photos weren’t published until winter 1963. Furthermore, Klumpp published only one layout from our shooting session; most photographers managed to sell two magazine layouts from a one-day modelling assignment. Klumpp may have had a difficult time selling my pictures because Ron Vogel sold several layouts (and centrefolds) of me that were published in 1962 magazines. Ron got his photos to the market first. Klumpp may have found the Los Angeles photography scene too competitive because he moved back to Texas soon after our photo session. In Texas, he became a successful portrait photographer, periodically publishing a few additional glamour layouts.

Klumpp died in 2013 at age 77. A couple of years before he died, we exchanged emails and I asked if he had kept any of my photographs. He said that he had not. He sold the other photos he took during the session (along with my model release) to another photographer who then published them under his name. (This was legal, and sometimes done in the photography business at that time.) I have discovered one picture of me that was published under that other photographer’s name but have never found any other photos from my work with Klumpp.

 

Escapade #1

This was the two-page centerfold in the 1963 magazine as well as the centerfold in the Escapade Yearbook 1965,, a compilation of favorite photos and features published a year later.  Thanks to Kevin for providing me with his copy of this image – a better copy than I was able to reproduce.


 

Escapade #2

This was the first page of the layout, which was titled “Peace Corps Girl”.

 

Escapade #3

This was the top photograph on the opening page. A couple of people have asked for a print copy of this image but after many hours of trying to get it clear, I had to give up. Some magazine pictures cannot be transformed into print-quality photos. This one looks great in the magazine and on the internet, but Klumpp used a slow shutter speed while I swung the beads and, as a consequence, everything is slightly blurred. The internet forgives imperfections; print does not.

 

Escapade #4

This was the bottom photograph on the opening page. I wanted to print this picture for my own album because it is one of my favourite face photos. After many, many hours of work, I was able to produce an image that provided an acceptable print, although I couldn’t make my lips look natural. The lips don’t look natural in the magazine photo either. With the low quality paper used by most men’s magazines, subtle details are lost. Better quality paper was used only for the centrefold photo.

 

Escapade #5

This Escapade photograph has appeared on many internet sites but if you compare this version with the others, you can see a difference near the right eyelash. I have posted a copy of that original photo here.

It wasn’t until I printed the magazine picture on glossy photo paper that I noticed something wrong with that right eyelash. While viewing it in the magazine and on the internet, I thought that a false eyelash had come unstuck, although I couldn’t understand how this could have happened because I never wore false eyelashes. But after printing a glossy photo, I could see that it couldn’t be a false eyelash – it didn’t line up correctly when an eyelid was added. I then realized that the magazine’s art editor had drawn a fake squiggly line to make it appear to be an eyelash. He wanted to provide a better definition between the background and the right side of my face. In other words, it was a primitive attempt at air brushing. My tweaked version eliminates this squiggly line and shows a small eyelash where it would have appeared had the right side of my face not faded into the background.

 

Escapade #6

This is a lovely soft focus full-page color picture. It was flipped horizontally. Editors often flipped photos to balance the layout (either within a page or between two facing pages). I sometimes know when this has occurred because the areola of my right breast was visibly larger than the areola of my left one (and my left breast was one-size larger than my right one). This asymmetry was noticeable in only a few photos published in magazines (but visible in many unpublished photos that I possess).

This was the second-to-last page in the layout. My face is turned toward the blurb on the final page, which is why the photo was flipped.

 

Escapade #7

Near the end of the session, Klumpp’s wife went into their bedroom and brought out a large teddy bear. Hugging this cuddly toy was a lovely way to end the session and a perfect photo to end the layout.

Misc Strawberry Blonde Photos by Elmer Batters

The previous post, Donna Cole by Elmer Batters, described in detail the circumstances wherein Elmer Batters photographed me with Strawberry Blonde hair. In the write-up, I mentioned that these photos were published in four magazines — Champagne, Late Show, Tip Top, and Nylon Jungle. Pictures from three of those magazines have now been posted to this blog. I have only scanned one photo from the large (and cluttered) Nylon Jungle set and so it will be a long time before that complete collection appears.

Here are three pictures that were not published in those magazines but were definitely taken by Batters on that movie set. There may be others floating around the internet. Please keep an eye open for me.

All three of these pictures can be purchased as autographed prints. Numbers 1 and 2 are approximately 7″ x 10″ in size; number 3 is approximately 6″ x 10″ in size.  Autographed prints have the copyright symbols removed.

Numbers 2 and 3 have been colorized by Old iZ New from a high dpi images I provided to him.

Batters Blonde #1

I found this one on the internet and immediately recognized it as part of the group that was taken at the same time as the Donna Cole photos. Why wasn’t it included? I think because I look sultry in the Donna Cole array — sensuous and exhausted at the same time. The photo below shows that I was just having fun while moving from pose to pose. So this photo, which shows me beaming while the camera is recording my antics, was not published.

Batters Blonde #2

This photo appeared in The Big Book of Legs, published in 2008 and I received a 8 x 10 print of it from the book publisher. Although a great picture, it never appeared in a magazine during the 1960s when my other strawberry blonde photos were published. It was also published in The Little Book of Legs in 2013.

Batters Blonde #2 Colourized

Below is Batters Blonde #2 colourized by Old iZ New.

Batters Blonde #3

This photo appeared in The Big Butt Book, published in 2010, where it was featured as a two-page layout. It later appeared in The Little Book of butts, published in 2013. Like #2 above, it was never published in a 1960s magazine.

Batters Blonde #3 Colourized

Below is Batters Blonde #3 colourized by Old iZ New.

Donna Cole by Elmer Batters

My final modelling job took place on a movie set. It lasted four days, beginning on August 5 or 6, 1963. I can pinpoint the date so precisely because the four-day assignment occurred in a single week, starting either Monday or Tuesday. I had a memorable 23rd birthday in Las Vegas on July 27, 1963 and returned home to Los Angeles on July 29. My agent told me about the movie assignment two days later and I started work the following week. I can’t pinpoint any other photo shoot as precisely as I can this set. It was my memorable birthday holiday that kept the timeline firmly in my mind.

The movie was shot in a warehouse located in the San Fernando Valley. After I arrived and signed in, a makeup artist applied foundation to my face and neck and then skillfully highlighted my lips and eyes. She was followed by a hair stylist who backcombed my limp, over-bleached hair to give it volume. Then I joined two other girls. We were all topless, all clad in skimpy black satin bikini bottoms and black nylons (with seams) that had tight elastic bands to keep them from falling down (so no garter belts). I was wearing my usual gold shoes with the two-inch heels. The three of us were standing outside the makeup room, awkwardly staring at walls, because there has been a delay in shooting our scene; the crew and movie camera were in another section of the warehouse, filming an episode that was supposed to have been completed on the previous day.

Elmer Batters stepped through a door, caught my eye, and crooked his finger to indicate “come here.” He led me to a room containing a large bed and took a series of photos. That is all that occurred on that first day.

The second day, took place in the same room but the furniture had been rearranged. The bed had disappeared, and a couch and coffee table added. Each model had a separate turn in front of the movie camera. I don’t know exactly what we did. I think we may each have gone through a dance routine — a “maybe” because the movie was never finished and no copies of it exist. All that remains of this modelling gig are a few photos shot before, during, and after the filming by the two still photographers — Elmer Batters and Jim Sullivan.

I always remembered the movie, our costumes, and my over-teased hair. But I never saw any of the photos that were taken until I joined the My Archives website. Soon after joining, someone asked if “this” was me. “This” was a ZIP file being passed around the internet and containing photos diligently scanned from a magazine layout that was simply labeled “Donna Cole”.

I immediately identified “Donna Cole” as being me and soon discovered that the photos had appeared in a December 1964 Tip Top magazine. It took another five years to find and purchase the magazine on eBay. In addition to this Donna Cole set, pictures taken by Elmer Batters from this movie set appeared in Champagne, Late Show, and Nylon Jungle

This was the only time I modelled with strawberry blonde hair. Except for one published picture, all the photos in the magazine layouts were b/w, and so my hair looks brown in these layouts. Only one colour photo was published — in Champagne magazine.

With regards to the Donna Cole set, there is one photo of me lying on a bed that Batters took that first day; all the other pictures were taken on the second day. In those, I look wasted, like I had just gone through an exhausting dance routine. In Tip Top, those second-day photos were printed with a rose tone. Possibly this was done because of the harsh lighting; it was set up for movie camera filming rather than still camera filming.

In cleaning up this set, I removed the rose tone, returning the pictures to their original b/w condition.

Only three of these pictures can be purchased as autographed prints — #1, #2, and #3. Number 1 is approximately 7″ x 10″ in size; numbers 2 and 3 are approximately 7.5″ x 10″ in size.  Autographed prints have the copyright symbols removed.

Three photos have been colorized by Old iZ New from a high dpi images I provided to him.

 

Tip Top magazine p. 14-15

 

Tip Top magazine p. 16-17

 

Tip Top magazine p. 18-19

 

Donna Cole #1

This is the best-known of all the Donna Cole pictures. A copy also appeared in Dian Hanson’s: The History of Men’s Magazines, Vol. 4, published in 2005. Prints are size 6.9″ x 10″.

 

Donna Cole #1 Colourized

Below is Donna Cole #1 colourized by Old iZ New.

 

Donna Cole #2

Doing a type of shoulder stand on the couch. Prints are size 7.5″ x 10″

 

Donna Cole #2 Colourized

Below is Donna Cole #2 colourized by Old iZ New.

 

Donna Cole #3

Lying on the coffee table with my gold shoe near my mouth. Prints are size 7.3″ x 10″.

 

Donna Cole #4

Lying over that coffee table with my back arched.

 

Donna Cole #5

Sitting on a round table.

 

Donna Cole #6

My legs are on the bench and my body is on the floor.  It was a small picture in the magazine.

 

Donna Cole #7

On the sofa holding one glove near my mouth.  It was a small picture in the magazine.

 

Donna Cole #8

Reclining on the sofa.  Again, it was a small picture in the magazine.

 

Donna Cole #9

This was the picture taken on my first day on the set.

 

Donna Cole #9 Colourized

Below is Donna Cole #9 colourized by Old iZ New.

 

 

In Front of Dresser by Ron Vogel

Ron Vogel shot his b/w photos very quickly.  Click, click, click.  Each time, I was to move or change my expression.  By the time this series of photos was taken, we had worked together five times and so I was able to work quickly with him.  Unfortunately sometimes Ron clicked before he framed the shot.  This is a series that was shot using 35mm film — I have the negatives.

In all these photos, I am wearing the yellow see-through top that I wore on the cover of Figure Annual.

All these pictures can be purchased as autographed prints.  The pictures are size 7.5 x 10 printed on glossy 8.5 x 11 glossy photo paper.  Autographed prints have the copyright symbols removed.

Some photos have been colorized by Old iZ New from high dpi images I provided to him.

Dresser #1

Here my left foot is hidden behind the corner of a bed.

Dresser #2

Again my left foot is hidden behind the corner of the bed.  It could have been a great shot otherwise.

Dresser #2 Colorized

Below is Dresser #2 colorized by Old iZ New.

Dresser #3

In Dresser #3, not only is part of my left foot is hidden behind the corner of a bed but also my breasts are hidden by the folds of the baby doll peignoir.

Dresser #4

Here my body is identical to #3. My head has moved and a bit more of my toes are visible.

Dresser #5

The pose in the photo below is identical to the one in the photo above (#4) except for the tilt of my head.

Dresser #6

In Dresser #6 one of my breasts is uncovered but the toes of my left foot are still hidden by the corner of a bed.

 

Dresser #7

The pose in the photo below is identical to the one above (#6) except for the tilt of my head.  My toes are still cut off by the corner of the bed.

Dresser #8

Finally, Vogel got it correct. He had me fold up tighter so that the foot was no longer hidden by the bed. Then he took five additional photos. Each time, I changed the tilt of my head and expression. Four of these five were quite good and two were published.

Dresser #9

Dresser #10

Dresser #10 appeared in a 1963 issue of the magazine Sassy.

Dresser #11

Dresser #12

Dresser #12 appeared in Modern Man’s 1964 Yearbook of Queens.

Dresser #12 Colorized

Below is Dresser #12 colorized by Old iZ New.